Download Children of Coyote  Missionaries of Saint Francis PDF
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Publisher : UNC Press Books
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ISBN 10 : 9780807839010
Pages : 497 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (78 users)
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Download or read book Children of Coyote Missionaries of Saint Francis written by Steven W. Hackel and published by UNC Press Books. This book was released on 2017-01-15 with total page 497 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Recovering lost voices and exploring issues intimate and institutional, this sweeping examination of Spanish California illuminates Indian struggles against a confining colonial order and amidst harrowing depopulation. To capture the enormous challenges Indians confronted, Steven W. Hackel integrates textual and quantitative sources and weaves together analyses of disease and depopulation, marriage and sexuality, crime and punishment, and religious, economic, and political change. As colonization reduced their numbers and remade California, Indians congregated in missions, where they forged communities under Franciscan oversight. Yet missions proved disastrously unhealthful and coercive, as Franciscans sought control over Indians' beliefs and instituted unfamiliar systems of labor and punishment. Even so, remnants of Indian groups still survived when Mexican officials ended Franciscan rule in the 1830s. Many regained land and found strength in ancestral cultures that predated the Spaniards' arrival. At this study's heart are the dynamic interactions in and around Mission San Carlos Borromeo between Monterey region Indians (the Children of Coyote) and Spanish missionaries, soldiers, and settlers. Hackel places these local developments in the context of the California mission system and draws comparisons between California and other areas of the Spanish Borderlands and colonial America. Concentrating on the experiences of the Costanoan and Esselen peoples during the colonial period, Children of Coyote concludes with an epilogue that carries the story of their survival to the present day.


Download A Companion to California History PDF
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Publisher : John Wiley & Sons
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ISBN 10 : 9781118798041
Pages : 546 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (187 users)
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Download or read book A Companion to California History written by William Deverell and published by John Wiley & Sons. This book was released on 2014-01-28 with total page 546 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This volume of original essays by leading scholars is an innovative, thorough introduction to the history and culture of California. Includes 30 essays by leading scholars in the field Essays range widely across perspectives, including political, social, economic, and environmental history Essays with similar approaches are paired and grouped to work as individual pieces and as companions to each other throughout the text Produced in association with the Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West


Download Art for an Undivided Earth PDF
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Publisher : Duke University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780822372790
Pages : 320 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (223 users)
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Download or read book Art for an Undivided Earth written by Jessica L. Horton and published by Duke University Press. This book was released on 2017-05-19 with total page 320 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In Art for an Undivided Earth Jessica L. Horton reveals how the spatial philosophies underlying the American Indian Movement (AIM) were refigured by a generation of artists searching for new places to stand. Upending the assumption that Jimmie Durham, James Luna, Kay WalkingStick, Robert Houle, and others were primarily concerned with identity politics, she joins them in remapping the coordinates of a widely shared yet deeply contested modernity that is defined in great part by the colonization of the Americas. She follows their installations, performances, and paintings across the ocean and back in time, as they retrace the paths of Native diplomats, scholars, performers, and objects in Europe after 1492. Along the way, Horton intervenes in a range of theories about global modernisms, Native American sovereignty, racial difference, archival logic, artistic itinerancy, and new materialisms. Writing in creative dialogue with contemporary artists, she builds a picture of a spatially, temporally, and materially interconnected world—an undivided earth.


Download California Exposures  Envisioning Myth and History PDF
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Publisher : W. W. Norton & Company
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ISBN 10 : 9780393243079
Pages : 320 pages
Rating : 4.3/5 (932 users)
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Download or read book California Exposures Envisioning Myth and History written by Richard White and published by W. W. Norton & Company. This book was released on 2020-03-17 with total page 320 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: A brilliant California history, in word and image, from an award-winning historian and a documentary photographer. “This is the West, sir. When the legend becomes fact, print the legend.” This indelible quote from The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance applies especially well to California, where legend has so thoroughly become fact that it is visible in everyday landscapes. Our foremost historian of the West, Richard White, never content to “print the legend,” collaborates here with his son, a talented photographer, in excavating the layers of legend built into California’s landscapes. Together they expose the bedrock of the past, and the history they uncover is astonishing. Jesse White’s evocative photographs illustrate the sites of Richard’s historical investigations. A vista of Drakes Estero conjures the darkly amusing story of the Drake Navigators Guild and its dubious efforts to establish an Anglo-Saxon heritage for California. The restored Spanish missions of Los Angeles frame another origin story in which California’s native inhabitants, civilized through contact with friars, gift their territories to white settlers. But the history is not so placid. A quiet riverside park in the Tulare Lake Basin belies scenes of horror from when settlers in the 1850s transformed native homelands into American property. Near the lake bed stands a small marker commemorating the Mussel Slough massacre, the culmination of a violent struggle over land titles between local farmers and the Southern Pacific Railroad in the 1870s. Tulare is today a fertile agricultural county, but its population is poor and unhealthy. The California Dream lives elsewhere. The lake itself disappeared when tributary rivers were rerouted to deliver government-subsidized water to big agriculture and cities. But climate change ensures that it will be back—the only question is when.


Download A History of Christian Conversion PDF
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Publisher : Oxford University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780199910922
Pages : 836 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (999 users)
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Download or read book A History of Christian Conversion written by David W. Kling and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2020-05-05 with total page 836 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Conversion has played a central role in the history of Christianity. In this first in-depth and wide-ranging narrative history, David Kling examines the dynamic of turning to the Christian faith by individuals, families, and people groups. Global in reach, the narrative progresses from early Christian beginnings in the Roman world to Christianity's expansion into Europe, the Americas, China, India, and Africa. Conversion is often associated with a particular strand of modern Christianity (evangelical) and a particular type of experience (sudden, overwhelming). However, when examined over two millennia, it emerges as a phenomenon far more complex than any one-dimensional profile would suggest. No single, unitary paradigm defines conversion and no easily explicable process accounts for why people convert to Christianity. Rather, a multiplicity of factors-historical, personal, social, geographical, theological, psychological, and cultural-shape the converting process. A History of Christian Conversion not only narrates the conversions of select individuals and peoples, it also engages current theories and models to explain conversion, and examines recurring themes in the conversion process: divine presence, gender and the body, agency and motivation, testimony and memory, group- and self-identity, "authentic" and "nominal" conversion, and modes of communication. Accessible to scholars, students, and those with a general interest in conversion, Kling's book is the most satisfying and comprehensive account of conversion in Christian history to date; this major work will become a standard must-read in conversion studies.


Download Conquering Sickness PDF
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Publisher : U of Nebraska Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780803295841
Pages : 328 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (32 users)
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Download or read book Conquering Sickness written by Mark Allan Goldberg and published by U of Nebraska Press. This book was released on 2017-02-01 with total page 328 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Conquering Sickness presents a comprehensive analysis of race, health, and colonization in a specific cross-cultural contact zone in the Texas borderlands between 1780 and 1861. Throughout this eighty-year period, ordinary health concerns shaped cross-cultural interactions during Spanish, Mexican, and Anglo colonization. Historians have shown us that Spanish, Mexican, and Anglo American settlers in the contested borderlands read the environment to determine how to live healthy, productive lives. Colonizers similarly outlined a culture of healthy living by observing local Native and Mexican populations. For colonists, Texas residents’ so-called immorality—evidenced by their “indolence,” “uncleanliness,” and “sexual impropriety”—made them unhealthy. In the Spanish and Anglo cases, the state made efforts to reform Indians into healthy subjects by confining them in missions or on reservations. Colonists’ views of health were taken as proof of their own racial superiority, on the one hand, and of Native and Mexican inferiority, on the other, and justified the various waves of conquest. As in other colonial settings, however, the medical story of Texas colonization reveals colonial contradictions. Mark Allan Goldberg analyzes how colonizing powers evaluated, incorporated, and discussed local remedies. Conquering Sickness reveals how health concerns influenced cross-cultural relations, negotiations, and different forms of state formation. Focusing on Texas, Goldberg examines the racialist thinking of the region in order to understand evolving concepts of health, race, and place in the nineteenth century borderlands.


Download A History of Religion in America PDF
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Publisher : Routledge
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ISBN 10 : 9781136688911
Pages : 164 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (366 users)
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Download or read book A History of Religion in America written by Bryan F. Le Beau and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2017-09-18 with total page 164 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: A History of Religion in America: From the First Settlements through the Civil War provides comprehensive coverage of the history of religion in America from the pre-colonial era through the aftermath of the Civil War. It explores major religious groups in the United States and the following topics: • Native American religion before and after the Columbian encounter • Religion and the Founding Fathers • Was America founded as a Christian nation? • Religion and reform in the 19th century • The first religious outsiders • A nation and its churches divided Chronologically arranged and integrating various religious developments into a coherent historical narrative, this book also contains useful chapter summaries and review questions. Designed for undergraduate religious studies and history students A History of Religion in America provides a substantive and comprehensive introduction to the complexity of religion in American history.


Download Son of Vengeance PDF
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Publisher : University of Oklahoma Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780806191669
Pages : 303 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (61 users)
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Download or read book Son of Vengeance written by Bradley Folsom and published by University of Oklahoma Press. This book was released on 2022-10-06 with total page 303 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Since the early 1800s, the violent exploits of “El Indio” Rafael through the settlements of northern New Spain have become the stuff of myth and legend. For some, the fabled Apache was a hero, an indigenous Robin Hood who fought oppressive Spaniards to help the dispossessed and downtrodden. For others, he was little more than a merciless killer. In Son of Vengeance, Bradley Folsom sets out to find the real Rafael—to extract the true story from the scant historical record and superabundance of speculation. What he uncovers is that many of the legends about Rafael were true: he was both daring and one of the most prolific serial killers in North American history. Rafael was born into an Apache family, but from a young age he was raised by Spanish chaplain Rafael Nevares, who took his indigenous prodigy out on patrol with local soldiers and taught him to speak Spanish and practice Catholicism. Rafael’s forced assimilation heightened the tension between his ancestry and the Hispanic environment and spurred him to violence. Sifting Spanish military and government documents, church records, contemporary newspapers, and eyewitness accounts, Folsom reveals a three-dimensional historical figure whose brutality was matched and abetted by great ingenuity—and by a deep, long-standing hostility between the Spanish and the Apaches of New Spain. The early years of tutelage under Nevares also, perversely, contributed to Rafael’s brutal success. Rather than leading to a life of Christian piety and Spanish loyalty, the knowledge Rafael gained from his mentor served instead to help him evade his pursuers and the law, at least for a time. In Son of Vengeance, we see the real El Indio Rafael for the first time—the man behind the cultural myth, and the historical forces and circumstances that framed and propelled his feats of violence.


Download The Oxford Handbook of American Indian History PDF
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Publisher : Oxford University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780199858897
Pages : 665 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (998 users)
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Download or read book The Oxford Handbook of American Indian History written by Frederick E. Hoxie and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2016 with total page 665 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The Oxford Handbook of American Indian History presents the story of the indigenous peoples who lived-and live-in the territory that became the United States. It describes the major aspects of the historical change that occurred over the past 500 years with essays by leading experts, both Native and non-Native, that focus on significant moments of upheaval and change.


Download The Colonial Era PDF
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Publisher : John Wiley & Sons
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ISBN 10 : 9781405156622
Pages : 245 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (51 users)
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Download or read book The Colonial Era written by Paul G. E. Clemens and published by John Wiley & Sons. This book was released on 2007-12-26 with total page 245 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Comprehensive and accessible, this title offers a clear and original framework for studying the important issues in colonial American history. Provides students with more than 60 essential documents on Colonial America Short headnotes introduce each selection Begins with a brief introduction by the editor and concludes with a bibliography designed to stimulate student research Can be used in conjunction with other books in a course or as a stand-alone text


Download Promiscuous Power PDF
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Publisher : University of Texas Press
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ISBN 10 : 9781477315859
Pages : 252 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (773 users)
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Download or read book Promiscuous Power written by Martin Austin Nesvig and published by University of Texas Press. This book was released on 2018-07-01 with total page 252 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Scholars have written reams on the conquest of Mexico, from the grand designs of kings, viceroys, conquistadors, and inquisitors to the myriad ways that indigenous peoples contested imperial authority. But the actual work of establishing the Spanish empire in Mexico fell to a host of local agents—magistrates, bureaucrats, parish priests, ranchers, miners, sugar producers, and many others—who knew little and cared less about the goals of their superiors in Mexico City and Madrid. Through a case study of the province of Michoacán in western Mexico, Promiscuous Power focuses on the prosaic agents of colonialism to offer a paradigm-shifting view of the complexities of making empire at the ground level. Presenting rowdy, raunchy, and violent life histories from the archives, Martin Austin Nesvig reveals that the local colonizers of Michoacán were primarily motivated by personal gain, emboldened by the lack of oversight from the upper echelons of power, and thoroughly committed to their own corporate memberships. His findings challenge some of the most deeply held views of the Spanish colonization of Mexico, including the Black Legend, which asserts that the royal state and the institutional church colluded to produce a powerful Catholicism that crushed heterodoxy, punished cultural difference, and ruined indigenous worlds. Instead, Nesvig finds that Michoacán—typical of many frontier provinces of the empire—became a region of refuge from imperial and juridical control and formal Catholicism, where the ordinary rules of law, jurisprudence, and royal oversight collapsed in the entropy of decentralized rule.


Download American Child Bride PDF
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Publisher : UNC Press Books
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ISBN 10 : 9781469629544
Pages : 369 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (696 users)
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Download or read book American Child Bride written by Nicholas L. Syrett and published by UNC Press Books. This book was released on 2016-09-02 with total page 369 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Most in the United States likely associate the concept of the child bride with the mores and practices of the distant past. But Nicholas L. Syrett challenges this assumption in his sweeping and sometimes shocking history of youthful marriage in America. Focusing on young women and girls--the most common underage spouses--Syrett tracks the marital history of American minors from the colonial period to the present, chronicling the debates and moral panics related to these unions. Although the frequency of child marriages has declined since the early twentieth century, Syrett reveals that the practice was historically far more widespread in the United States than is commonly thought. It also continues to this day: current estimates indicate that 9 percent of living American women were married before turning eighteen. By examining the legal and social forces that have worked to curtail early marriage in America--including the efforts of women's rights activists, advocates for children's rights, and social workers--Syrett sheds new light on the American public's perceptions of young people marrying and the ways that individuals and communities challenged the complex legalities and cultural norms brought to the fore when underage citizens, by choice or coercion, became husband and wife.


Download Atlantic History PDF
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Publisher : OUP USA
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ISBN 10 : 9780195320336
Pages : 382 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (953 users)
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Download or read book Atlantic History written by Jack D. Greene and published by OUP USA. This book was released on 2009 with total page 382 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This title offers an incisive look at how interpretations of the Atlantic world have changed over time and from a variety of national perspectives. This volume discusses key areas of the Atlantic world, including the British, Dutch, French, Iberian, and African Atlantic, as well as the movement of ideas, peoples, and goods.


Download City of Inmates PDF
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Publisher : UNC Press Books
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ISBN 10 : 9781469631196
Pages : 312 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (696 users)
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Download or read book City of Inmates written by Kelly Lytle Hernández and published by UNC Press Books. This book was released on 2017-02-15 with total page 312 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Los Angeles incarcerates more people than any other city in the United States, which imprisons more people than any other nation on Earth. This book explains how the City of Angels became the capital city of the world's leading incarcerator. Marshaling more than two centuries of evidence, historian Kelly Lytle Hernandez unmasks how histories of native elimination, immigrant exclusion, and black disappearance drove the rise of incarceration in Los Angeles. In this telling, which spans from the Spanish colonial era to the outbreak of the 1965 Watts Rebellion, Hernandez documents the persistent historical bond between the racial fantasies of conquest, namely its settler colonial form, and the eliminatory capacities of incarceration. But City of Inmates is also a chronicle of resilience and rebellion, documenting how targeted peoples and communities have always fought back. They busted out of jail, forced Supreme Court rulings, advanced revolution across bars and borders, and, as in the summer of 1965, set fire to the belly of the city. With these acts those who fought the rise of incarceration in Los Angeles altered the course of history in the city, the borderlands, and beyond. This book recounts how the dynamics of conquest met deep reservoirs of rebellion as Los Angeles became the City of Inmates, the nation's carceral core. It is a story that is far from over.


Download From Colony to Nationhood in Mexico PDF
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Publisher : Cambridge University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9781107006300
Pages : 263 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (7 users)
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Download or read book From Colony to Nationhood in Mexico written by Sean F. McEnroe and published by Cambridge University Press. This book was released on 2012-06-18 with total page 263 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: "In November 1782, Vicente Gonzales de Santianes, the governor of Nuevo Leon, received a sheaf of documents from a protracted legal dispute in the Indian town of San Miguel de Aguayo. At first glance, the case seems so utterly commonplace as to be beneath the notice of the region's chief magistrate. One of San Miguel's Tlaxcalan stoneworkers had been accused of an adulterous liaison with a townswoman"--Provided by publisher.


Download Race and Ethnicity in America  From Pre contact to the Present  4 volumes  PDF
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Publisher : ABC-CLIO
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ISBN 10 : 9781440850974
Pages : 1360 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (48 users)
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Download or read book Race and Ethnicity in America From Pre contact to the Present 4 volumes written by Russell M. Lawson and published by ABC-CLIO. This book was released on 2019-10-11 with total page 1360 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Divided into four volumes, Race and Ethnicity in America provides a complete overview of the history of racial and ethnic relations in America, from pre-contact to the present. Contextualizes the political experiences and contributions of minorities within American politics, society, and culture Includes people of color (e.g., African Americans, Latinos, Asians, and American Indians), those of mixed races, and ethnic groups that experienced minority status in politics, particularly in the 19th century (e.g., Irish, Jewish, Italian) Features chronological organization as well as a historical overview and timeline for contextual understanding and ease of reference Comprises A–Z entries that detail the political, social, and cultural histories of racial and ethnic minority groups, and concludes with a curated selection of key primary source documents Provides cross-disciplinary information that explores the experiences of racial and ethnic minorities in America over a period of five hundred years through history and social studies, political science, and ethnic studies


Download Writing Material Culture History PDF
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Publisher : Bloomsbury Publishing
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ISBN 10 : 9781472518590
Pages : 353 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (725 users)
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Download or read book Writing Material Culture History written by Anne Gerritsen and published by Bloomsbury Publishing. This book was released on 2014-12-18 with total page 353 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Writing Material Culture History examines the methodologies currently used in the historical study of material culture. Touching on archaeology, art history, literary studies and anthropology, the book provides history students with a fundamental understanding of the relationship between artefacts and historical narratives. The role of museums, the impact of the digital age and the representations of objects in public history are just some of the issues addressed in a book that brings together key scholars from around the world. A range of artefacts, including a 16th-century Peruvian crown and a 19th-century Alaskan Sea Lion overcoat, are considered, illustrating the myriad ways in which objects and history relate to one another. Bringing together scholars working in a variety of disciplines, this book provides a critical introduction for students interested in material culture, history and historical methodologies.