Download Reconstructing Human Landscape Interactions   Volume 1 PDF
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Publisher : Springer Science & Business Media
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ISBN 10 : 9783642237584
Pages : 55 pages
Rating : 4.6/5 (422 users)
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Download or read book Reconstructing Human Landscape Interactions Volume 1 written by Brett T. McLaurin and published by Springer Science & Business Media. This book was released on 2012-01-03 with total page 55 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The Holocene is unique when compared to earlier geological time in that humans begin to alter and manipulate the natural environment to their own needs. Domestication of crops and animals and the resultant intensification of agriculture lead to profound changes in the impact humans have on the environment. Conversely, as human populations began to increase geologic and climatic factors begin to have a greater impact on civilizations. To understand and reconstruct the complex interplay between humans and the environment over the past ten thousand years requires examination of multiple differing but interconnected aspects of the environment and involves geomorphology, paleoecology, geoarchaeology and paleoclimatology. These Springer Briefs volumes examine the dynamic interplay between humans and the natural environment as reconstructed by the many and varied sub-fields of the Earth Sciences.


Download Reconstructing Human Landscape Interactions   PDF
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Publisher : Springer
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ISBN 10 : 3642237606
Pages : 64 pages
Rating : 4.2/5 (376 users)
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Download or read book Reconstructing Human Landscape Interactions written by and published by Springer. This book was released on 2012-01-21 with total page 64 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt:


Download Reconstructing Human Landscape Interactions   Volume 1 PDF
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Publisher : Springer Science & Business Media
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ISBN 10 : 9783642237591
Pages : 55 pages
Rating : 4.6/5 (422 users)
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Download or read book Reconstructing Human Landscape Interactions Volume 1 written by Brett T. McLaurin and published by Springer Science & Business Media. This book was released on 2012-01-03 with total page 55 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The Holocene is unique when compared to earlier geological time in that humans begin to alter and manipulate the natural environment to their own needs. Domestication of crops and animals and the resultant intensification of agriculture lead to profound changes in the impact humans have on the environment. Conversely, as human populations began to increase geologic and climatic factors begin to have a greater impact on civilizations. To understand and reconstruct the complex interplay between humans and the environment over the past ten thousand years requires examination of multiple differing but interconnected aspects of the environment and involves geomorphology, paleoecology, geoarchaeology and paleoclimatology. These Springer Briefs volumes examine the dynamic interplay between humans and the natural environment as reconstructed by the many and varied sub-fields of the Earth Sciences.


Download Reconstructing Human landscape Interactions PDF
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Publisher : Cambridge Scholars Pub
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ISBN 10 : STANFORD:36105124043238
Pages : 283 pages
Rating : 4.F/5 ( users)
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Download or read book Reconstructing Human landscape Interactions written by Lucy Wilson and published by Cambridge Scholars Pub. This book was released on 2007 with total page 283 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Reconstructing Human-Landscape Interactions demonstrates the high quality of work presented at the first Developing International Geoarchaeology conference (DIG 2005), held in Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada, and exemplifies the over-riding theme of this discipline. People have always used the landscape in many ways: as a place to live, as a place to grow crops, as a source of natural resources. Those actions leave their traces. The characteristics of the landscape constrain which activities are possible, just as social and cultural habits condition peopleâ (TM)s connection with the environment. Geoarchaeology is about finding the traces of these interactions, and using them to reconstruct how people in the past behaved in their environmental context. The material covered in the proceedings ranges from broad themes of climate change and landscape use, to more specific subjects such as river avulsion and the use of tidal ponds. The papers move us from the land to the coastal margin and back onto land to examine particular techniques. The final paper leads us beyond archaeology and points out that geoarchaeological data must contribute to the debate about the sustainability of present-day land-use practices: a fitting challenge to take us into the future.


Download Reconstructing Human Landscape Interactions   Volume 1  Interpreting Desert and Fluvial Environments PDF
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Publisher :
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ISBN 10 : 1280396733
Pages : 62 pages
Rating : 4.3/5 (967 users)
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Download or read book Reconstructing Human Landscape Interactions Volume 1 Interpreting Desert and Fluvial Environments written by Springer and published by . This book was released on 2012-05-22 with total page 62 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The Holocene is unique when compared to earlier geological time in that humans begin to alter and manipulate the natural environment to their own needs. Domestication of crops and animals and the resultant intensification of agriculture lead to profound changes in the impact humans have on the environment. Conversely, as human populations began to increase geologic and climatic factors begin to have a greater impact on civilizations. To understand and reconstruct the complex interplay between humans and the environment over the past ten thousand years requires examination of multiple differing but interconnected aspects of the environment and involves geomorphology, paleoecology, geoarchaeology and paleoclimatology. These Springer Briefs volumes examine the dynamic interplay between humans and the natural environment as reconstructed by the many and varied sub-fields of the Earth Sciences."


Download Reconstructing Human Landscape Interactions PDF
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Publisher : Cambridge Scholars Publishing
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ISBN 10 : 9781443809139
Pages : 291 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (438 users)
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Download or read book Reconstructing Human Landscape Interactions written by Pam Dickinson and published by Cambridge Scholars Publishing. This book was released on 2009-03-26 with total page 291 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Reconstructing Human-Landscape Interactions demonstrates the high quality of work presented at the first Developing International Geoarchaeology conference (DIG 2005), held in Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada, and exemplifies the over-riding theme of this discipline. People have always used the landscape in many ways: as a place to live, as a place to grow crops, as a source of natural resources. Those actions leave their traces. The characteristics of the landscape constrain which activities are possible, just as social and cultural habits condition people’s connection with the environment. Geoarchaeology is about finding the traces of these interactions, and using them to reconstruct how people in the past behaved in their environmental context. The material covered in the proceedings ranges from broad themes of climate change and landscape use, to more specific subjects such as river avulsion and the use of tidal ponds. The papers move us from the land to the coastal margin and back onto land to examine particular techniques. The final paper leads us beyond archaeology and points out that geoarchaeological data must contribute to the debate about the sustainability of present-day land-use practices: a fitting challenge to take us into the future.


Download Human Environment Interactions   Volume 2 PDF
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Publisher : Springer Science & Business Media
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ISBN 10 : 9783642368806
Pages : 101 pages
Rating : 4.6/5 (423 users)
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Download or read book Human Environment Interactions Volume 2 written by Michelle Goman and published by Springer Science & Business Media. This book was released on 2013-11-04 with total page 101 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The Holocene is unique when compared to earlier geological time in that humans begin to alter and manipulate the natural environment to their own needs. Domestication of crops and animals and the resultant intensification of agriculture lead to profound changes in the impact humans have on the environment. Conversely, as human populations began to increase geologic and climatic factors begin to have a greater impact on civilizations. To understand and reconstruct the complex interplay between humans and the environment over the past ten thousand years requires examination of multiple differing but interconnected aspects of the environment and involves geomorphology, paleoecology, geoarchaeology and paleoclimatology. These Springer Briefs volumes examine the dynamic interplay between humans and the natural environment as reconstructed by the many and varied sub-fields of the Earth Sciences.


Download The Oxford Handbook of Historical Ecology and Applied Archaeology PDF
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Publisher : Oxford University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780191653346
Pages : 576 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (916 users)
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Download or read book The Oxford Handbook of Historical Ecology and Applied Archaeology written by Christian Isendahl and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2019-01-10 with total page 576 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The Oxford Handbook of Historical Ecology and Applied Archaeology presents theoretical discussions, methodological outlines, and case-studies describing the field of overlap between historical ecology and the emerging sub-discipline of applied archaeology to highlight how modern environments and landscapes have been shaped by humans. Historical ecology is based on the recognition that humans are not only capable of modifying their environments, but that all environments on earth have already been directly or indirectly modified. This includes anthropogenic climate change, widespread deforestations, and species extinctions, but also very local alterations, the effects of which may last a few years, or may have legacies lasting centuries or more. With contributions from anthropologists, archaeologists, human geographers, and historians, this volume focuses not just on defining human impacts in the past, but on the ways that understanding these changes can help inform contemporary practices and development policies. Some chapters present examples of how ancient or current societies have modified their environments in sustainable ways, while others highlight practices that had unintended long-term consequences. The possibilities of learning from these practices are discussed, as is the potential of using the long history of human resource exploitation as a method for building or testing models of future change. The volume offers overviews for students, researchers, and professionals with an interest in conservation or development projects who want to understand what practical insights can be drawn from history, and who seek to apply their work to contemporary issues.


Download Climate Change in Human History PDF
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Publisher : Bloomsbury Publishing
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ISBN 10 : 9781472598516
Pages : 256 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (725 users)
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Download or read book Climate Change in Human History written by Benjamin Lieberman and published by Bloomsbury Publishing. This book was released on 2018-01-25 with total page 256 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Climate Change and Human History provides an up-to-date and concise introduction to the relationship between human beings and climate change throughout history. Starting with periods hundreds of thousands of years ago and continuing up to the present day, the book illustrates how natural climate variability affected early human societies, and how humans are now altering climate drastically within much shorter periods of time. For each major period of time, the book will explain how climate change has created opportunities as well as risks and challenges for human societies. The book introduces and develops several related themes including: Phases of climate and history Factors that shape climate Climate shocks and sharp climate shifts Climate and the rise and fall of civilizations Industrialization and climate science Accelerating climate change, human societies, and the future An ideal companion for all students of environmental history, Climate Change and Human History clearly demonstrates the critical role of climate in shaping human history and of the experience of humans in both adapting to and shaping climate change.


Download Human Interactions with the Geosphere PDF
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Publisher : Geological Society of London
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ISBN 10 : 1862393257
Pages : 200 pages
Rating : 4.3/5 (932 users)
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Download or read book Human Interactions with the Geosphere written by Lucy Wilson and published by Geological Society of London. This book was released on 2011 with total page 200 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Human impact on our environment is not a new phenomenon. For millennia, humans have been coping with - or provoking - environmental change. We have exploited, extracted, over-used, but also in many cases nurtured, the resources that the geosphere offers. Geoarchaeology studies the traces of human interactions with the geosphere and provides the key to recognizing landscape and environmental change, human impacts and the effects of environmental change on human societies. This collection of papers from around the world includes case studies and broader reviews covering the time period since before modern human beings came into existence up until the present day. To understand ourselves, we need to understand that our world is constantly changing, and that change is dynamic and complex. Geoarchaeology provides an inclusive and long-term view of human-geosphere interactions and serves as a valuable aid to those who try to determine sustainable policies for the future.


Download Beyond Barrows PDF
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Publisher : Sidestone Press
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ISBN 10 : 9789088901089
Pages : 279 pages
Rating : 4.0/5 (889 users)
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Download or read book Beyond Barrows written by David Fontijn and published by Sidestone Press. This book was released on 2013-04-30 with total page 279 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Europe is dotted with tens of thousands of prehistoric barrows. In spite of their ubiquity, little is known on the role they had in pre- and protohistoric landscapes. In 2010, an international group of archaeologists came together at the conference of the European Association of Archaeologists in The Hague to discuss and review current research on this topic. This book presents the proceedings of that session. The focus is on the prehistory of Scandinavia and the Low Countries, but also includes an excursion to huge prehistoric mounds in the southeast of North America. One contribution presents new evidence on how the immediate environment of Neolithic Funnel Beaker (TRB) culture megaliths was ordered, another one discusses the role of remarkable single and double post alignments around Bronze and Iron Age burial mounds. Zooming out, several chapters deal with the place of barrows in the broader landscape. The significance of humanly-managed heath in relation to barrow groups is discussed, and one contribution emphasizes how barrow orderings not only reflect spatial organization, but are also important as conceptual anchors structuring prehistoric perception. Other authors, dealing with Early Neolithic persistent places and with Late Bronze Age/Early Iron Age urnfields, argue that we should also look beyond monumentality in order to understand long-term use of ritual landscapes . The book contains an important contribution by the well-known Swedish archaeologist Tore Artelius on how Bronze Age barrows were structurally re-used by pre-Christian Vikings. This is his last article, written briefly before his death. This book is dedicated to his memory. This publication is part of the Ancestral Mounds Research Project of the University of Leiden.


Download Geological Setting  Palaeoenvironment and Archaeology of the Red Sea PDF
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Publisher : Springer
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ISBN 10 : 9783319994086
Pages : 803 pages
Rating : 4.3/5 (199 users)
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Download or read book Geological Setting Palaeoenvironment and Archaeology of the Red Sea written by Najeeb M.A. Rasul and published by Springer. This book was released on 2018-12-05 with total page 803 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This book gathers invited contributions from active researchers to provide an up-to-date overview of the geological setting of the Red Sea. It discusses aspects ranging from historical information to modern research in the Red Sea, and presents findings from rapidly advancing, emerging fields. This semi-enclosed young ocean basin provides a unique opportunity to study the development of passive continental margins in order to examine the current status of that region. In addition to studies on the Sea itself, it includes those from related fields on the littoral zone. The book is of interest to geoscientists and non-specialists alike.


Download Environmental Reconstruction in Mediterranean Landscape Archaeology PDF
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Publisher : Oxbow Books
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ISBN 10 : 9781785704314
Pages : 225 pages
Rating : 4.7/5 (857 users)
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Download or read book Environmental Reconstruction in Mediterranean Landscape Archaeology written by Philippe Leveau and published by Oxbow Books. This book was released on 2016-10-31 with total page 225 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Contents include: Introduction ( K Walsh ); Palynology ( S Bottema ); A database for the palynological recording of human activity ( V Andrieu, E Brugiapaglia, R Cheddadi, M Reille and J-L de Beaulieu ); The contribution of anthracology ( J-L Vernet ); Dendroclimatology ( F Guibal ); Techniques in Landscape Archaeology ( A G Brown ); L'apport de la micromorphologie des sols ( N Fédoroff ); Reconstructing past soil environments ( R S Shiel ); The Geochemistry of Soil Sediments ( D D Gilbertson and J P Grattam ); Searching the Ports of Troy ( E Zanagger, M Timpson, S Yazvenko and H Leiermann ); The pontine region in central Italy ( P Attema, J Delvigne and B J Haagsma ); Population pressure on agricultural resources in Karstic landscapes ( P Novacovic, H Simoni and B Music ); La Pianura padana centrale tra il Bronzo Medio ed il Bronzo finale ( M Cremaschi ); The ancient ports of Marseille and Fos, Provence, southern France ( C Vella, C Morhange and M Provansal ); The evolution of field systems in the middle Rhône valley ( J-F Berger and C Jung ); La línea de Costa en época histórica en el Golfo de Valencia ( P Carmona ); The Vallée des Baux, Southern France ( P Leveau ); The étang de Berre, southern France ( F Trément ); Geoarchaeology in mediterranean landscape archaeology ( G Barker and J Bintliff ).


Download Handbook of Landscape Archaeology PDF
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Publisher : Routledge
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ISBN 10 : 9781315427720
Pages : 719 pages
Rating : 4.3/5 (154 users)
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Download or read book Handbook of Landscape Archaeology written by Bruno David and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2016-06-03 with total page 719 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Over the past three decades, “landscape” has become an umbrella term to describe many different strands of archaeology. From the processualist study of settlement patterns to the phenomenologist’s experience of the natural world, from human impact on past environments to the environment’s impact on human thought, action, and interaction, the term has been used. In this volume, for the first time, over 80 archaeologists from three continents attempt a comprehensive definition of the ideas and practices of landscape archaeology, covering the theoretical and the practical, the research and conservation, and encasing the term in a global framework. As a basic reference volume for landscape archaeology, this volume will be the benchmark for decades to come. All royalties on this Handbook are donated to the World Archaeological Congress.


Download The Routledge Handbook of Landscape Ecology PDF
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Publisher : Routledge
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ISBN 10 : 9780429679674
Pages : 502 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (296 users)
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Download or read book The Routledge Handbook of Landscape Ecology written by Robert A. Francis and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2021-09-09 with total page 502 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The Handbook provides a supporting guide to key aspects and applications of landscape ecology to underpin its research and teaching. A wide range of contributions written by expert researchers in the field summarize the latest knowledge on landscape ecology theory and concepts, landscape processes, methods and tools, and emerging frontiers. Landscape ecology is an interdisciplinary and holistic discipline, and this is reflected in the chapters contained in this Handbook. Authors from varying disciplinary backgrounds tackle key concepts such as landscape structure and function, scale and connectivity; landscape processes such as disturbance, flows, and fragmentation; methods such as remote sensing and mapping, fieldwork, pattern analysis, modelling, and participation and engagement in landscape planning; and emerging frontiers such as ecosystem services, landscape approaches to biodiversity conservation, and climate change. Each chapter provides a blend of the latest scientific understanding of its focal topics along with considerations and examples of their application from around the world. An invaluable guide to the concepts, methods, and applications of landscape ecology, this book will be an important reference text for a wide range of students and academics in ecology, geography, biology, and interdisciplinary environmental studies.


Download Minnesota s Geologist PDF
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Publisher : U of Minnesota Press
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ISBN 10 : 9781452963006
Pages : 280 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (529 users)
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Download or read book Minnesota s Geologist written by Sue Leaf and published by U of Minnesota Press. This book was released on 2020-06-09 with total page 280 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The story of the scientist who first mapped Minnesota’s geology, set against the backdrop of early scientific inquiry in the state At twenty, Newton Horace Winchell declared, “I know nothing about rocks.” At twenty-five, he decided to make them his life’s work. As a young geologist tasked with heading the Minnesota Geological and Natural History Survey, Winchell (1839–1914) charted the prehistory of the region, its era of inland seas, its volcanic activity, and its several ice ages—laying the foundation for the monumental five-volume Geology of Minnesota. Tracing Winchell’s remarkable path from impoverished fifteen-year-old schoolteacher to a leading light of an emerging scientific field, Minnesota’s Geologist also recreates the heady early days of scientific inquiry in Minnesota, a time when one man’s determination and passion for learning could unlock the secrets of the state’s distant past and present landscape. Traveling by horse and cart, by sailboat and birchbark canoe, Winchell and his group surveyed rock outcrops, river valleys, basalt formations on Lake Superior, and the vast Red River Valley. He studied petrology at the Sorbonne in Paris, bringing cutting-edge knowledge to bear on the volcanic rocks of the Arrowhead region. As a founder of the American Geological Society and founding editor of American Geologist, the first journal for professional geologists, Winchell was the driving force behind scientific endeavor in early state history, serving as mentor to many young scientists and presiding over a household—the Winchell House, located on the University of Minnesota’s present-day mall—that was a nexus of intellectual ferment. His life story, told here for the first time, draws an intimate picture of this influential scientist, set against a backdrop of Minnesota’s geological complexity and splendor.


Download Zooarchaeology and Modern Human Origins PDF
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Publisher : Springer Science & Business Media
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ISBN 10 : 9789400767669
Pages : 275 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (7 users)
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Download or read book Zooarchaeology and Modern Human Origins written by Jamie L. Clark and published by Springer Science & Business Media. This book was released on 2013-07-11 with total page 275 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Recent genetic data showing that Neanderthals interbred with modern humans have made it clear that deeper insight into the behavioral differences between these populations will be critical to understanding the rapid spread of modern humans and the demise of the Neanderthals. This volume, which brings together scholars who have worked with faunal assemblages from Europe, the Near East, and Africa, makes an important contribution to our broader understanding of Neanderthal extinction and modern human origins through its focus on variability in human hunting behavior between 70-25,000 years ago—a critical period in the later evolution of our species.​