Download Red River PDF
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Publisher : VIZ Media LLC
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ISBN 10 : 9781421562216
Pages : 188 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (215 users)
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Download or read book Red River written by Chie Shinohara and published by VIZ Media LLC. This book was released on 2013-03-19 with total page 188 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Yuri, a pretty Japanese girl, is ecstatic after passing her college entrance exam and having her first kiss with her childhood friend-turned boyfriend. However, her luck soon changes. She starts to notice that water becomes agitated whenever she goes near it. One night, hands appear out of a puddle on the street and drag her into the water! Transported to an ancient village in the Middle East, she is then captured by armed troops and taken to the Queeen's palace for a human sacrifice. Adventure and good-looking boys fill this great first volume! -- VIZ Media


Download Law  Life  and Government at Red River  Volume 1 PDF
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Publisher : McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
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ISBN 10 : 9780773597068
Pages : 549 pages
Rating : 4.7/5 (735 users)
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Download or read book Law Life and Government at Red River Volume 1 written by Dale Gibson and published by McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP. This book was released on 2015-06-01 with total page 549 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Inhabited by a diverse population of First Nations peoples, Métis, Scots, Upper and Lower Canadians, and Americans, and dominated by the commercial and governmental activities of the Hudson’s Bay Company, Red River – now Winnipeg – was a challenging settlement to oversee. This illuminating account presents the story of the unique legal and governmental system that attempted to do so and the mixed success it encountered, culminating in the 1869–70 Red River Rebellion and confederation with Canada in 1870. In Law, Life, and Government at Red River, Dale Gibson provides rich, revealing glimpses into the community, and its complex relations with the Hudson’s Bay: the colony’s owner, and primary employer. Volume 1 details the history of the settlement’s establishment, development, and ambivalent relationship with the legal and undemocratic, but gradually, grudgingly, slightly, more representitive, governmental institutions forming in the area, and the legal system’s evolving engagement with the Aboriginal population. A vivid look into early settler life, Law, Life, and Government at Red River offers insights into the political, commercial, and legal circumstances that unfolded during western expansion.


Download Law  Life  and Government at Red River  Volume 2 PDF
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Publisher : McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
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ISBN 10 : 9780773597075
Pages : 915 pages
Rating : 4.7/5 (735 users)
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Download or read book Law Life and Government at Red River Volume 2 written by Dale Gibson and published by McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP. This book was released on 2015-06-01 with total page 915 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Inhabited by a diverse population of First Nations peoples, Métis, Scots, Upper and Lower Canadians, and Americans, and dominated by the commercial and governmental activities of the Hudson’s Bay Company, Red River – now Winnipeg – was a challenging settlement to oversee. This illuminating account presents the story of the unique legal and governmental system that attempted to do so and the mixed success it encountered, culminating in the 1869–70 Red River Rebellion and confederation with Canada in 1870. In Law, Life, and Government at Red River, Dale Gibson provides rich, revealing glimpses into the community, and its complex relations with the Hudson’s Bay: the colony’s owner, and primary employer. Volume 2 provides a complete annotated, and never-before-published transcription of testimony from Red River’s courts, presenting hundreds of vignettes of frontier life, the cases that were brought before the courts, and the ways in which the courts resolved conflicts. A vivid look into early settler life, Law, Life, and Government at Red River offers insights into the political, commercial, and legal circumstances that unfolded during western expansion.


Download The Red River Trails PDF
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Publisher : Minnesota Historical Society
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ISBN 10 : 0873511336
Pages : 105 pages
Rating : 4.5/5 (113 users)
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Download or read book The Red River Trails written by Rhoda R. Gilman and published by Minnesota Historical Society. This book was released on 1979 with total page 105 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Trails go through Minnesota and part of North Dakota and Manitoba, Canada.


Download The Red River in Southwestern History PDF
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Publisher : University of Oklahoma Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780806153827
Pages : 238 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (61 users)
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Download or read book The Red River in Southwestern History written by Carl Newton Tyson and published by University of Oklahoma Press. This book was released on 2015-07-15 with total page 238 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In The Red River in Southwestern History, Carl Newton Tyson traces the river’s history from the time of early Spanish and French explorers to the present day, leading his readers to a new appreciation of the river and the region. From the Staked Plains of the Texas Panhandle the river flows down to buffalo and prairie dog country and through the Cross Timbers. It continues eastward to the Great Bend and through the cypresses of Louisiana’s bayou country, joining the Mississippi River south of Natchez. Whereas the Red River was a source of water to the Spaniards as they searched for gold, at Natchitoches, French trader Louis Juchereau de St. Denis traded with the Caddo Indians. Conflicts soon developed between French traders and Spaniards in Texas as they competed for land along the Red. Years later, the Red River featured again as part of the settlement in the 1819 Adams-Onís Treaty, negotiated by Spanish minister Luis de Onís y Gonzales and U.S. secretary of state John Quincy Adams, which finally brought to an end the western boundary disputes between Spain and the United States lingering since the 1803 Louisiana Purchase. In 1852 Randolph Marcy discovered the source of the Red River—a mountain rivulet cutting a deep canyon through the Staked Plains. Marcy’s testimony in the Greer County border dispute between Oklahoma and Texas was key to the U.S. Supreme Court decision favoring Oklahoma. In the decades between 1930 and 1970, dams were built along the Red by the U.S. Corps of Engineers to control floods, generate electricity, and create lakes for recreation along the Oklahoma-Texas border.


Download The Red River Campaign of 1864 and the Loss by the Confederacy of the Civil War PDF
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Publisher : McFarland
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ISBN 10 : 9781476615721
Pages : 192 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (766 users)
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Download or read book The Red River Campaign of 1864 and the Loss by the Confederacy of the Civil War written by Michael J. Forsyth and published by McFarland. This book was released on 2015-07-11 with total page 192 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The Union Army’s Red River Campaign began on March 12, 1864, with a two-pronged attack aimed at gaining control of Shreveport, Louisiana. It lasted until May 22, 1864, when, after suffering significant casualties, the Union army retreated to Simmesport, Louisiana. The campaign was an attempt to prevent Confederate alliance with the French in Mexico, deny supplies to Confederate forces, and secure vast quantities of Louisiana and Texas cotton for Northern mills. With this examination of Confederate leadership and how it affected the Red River Campaign, the author argues against the standard assumption that the campaign had no major effect on the outcome of the war. In fact, the South had—and lost—an excellent opportunity to inflict a decisive defeat that might have changed the course of history. With this campaign as an ideal example, the politics of military decision-making in general are also analyzed.


Download The Plains Cree PDF
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Publisher : University of Regina Press
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ISBN 10 : 0889770131
Pages : 400 pages
Rating : 4.7/5 (71 users)
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Download or read book The Plains Cree written by David Goodman Mandelbaum and published by University of Regina Press. This book was released on 1979 with total page 400 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Based on the author's thesis. Part I was previously published in 1940 by the American Museum of Natural History. This revised edition includes two additional comparative sections.


Download The Red River Campaign and Its Toll PDF
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Publisher : McFarland
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ISBN 10 : 9781476663784
Pages : 220 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (766 users)
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Download or read book The Red River Campaign and Its Toll written by Henry O. Robertson and published by McFarland. This book was released on 2016-03-30 with total page 220 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The Red River Campaign in the spring of 1864 was one of the most destructive of the Civil War. The agricultural wealth of the Red River Valley tempted Union General Nathaniel P. Banks to invade with 30,000 troops in an attempt to seize control of the river and confiscate as much cotton as possible from local plantations. After three months of chaos, during which the countryside was destroyed and many slaves freed themselves, Banks was defeated by a smaller Confederate force under General Richard Taylor. This book takes a fresh look at the fierce battles at Mansfield and Pleasant Hill, the Union army's escape from Monett's Ferry and the burning of Alexandria, and explains the causes and consequences of the war in Central Louisiana.


Download Reconstructing Human Landscape Interactions   Volume 1 PDF
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Publisher : Springer Science & Business Media
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ISBN 10 : 9783642237591
Pages : 55 pages
Rating : 4.6/5 (422 users)
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Download or read book Reconstructing Human Landscape Interactions Volume 1 written by Brett T. McLaurin and published by Springer Science & Business Media. This book was released on 2012-01-03 with total page 55 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The Holocene is unique when compared to earlier geological time in that humans begin to alter and manipulate the natural environment to their own needs. Domestication of crops and animals and the resultant intensification of agriculture lead to profound changes in the impact humans have on the environment. Conversely, as human populations began to increase geologic and climatic factors begin to have a greater impact on civilizations. To understand and reconstruct the complex interplay between humans and the environment over the past ten thousand years requires examination of multiple differing but interconnected aspects of the environment and involves geomorphology, paleoecology, geoarchaeology and paleoclimatology. These Springer Briefs volumes examine the dynamic interplay between humans and the natural environment as reconstructed by the many and varied sub-fields of the Earth Sciences.


Download A Legacy of Exploitation PDF
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Publisher : UBC Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780774866385
Pages : 298 pages
Rating : 4.7/5 (748 users)
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Download or read book A Legacy of Exploitation written by Susan Dianne Brophy and published by UBC Press. This book was released on 2022-05-15 with total page 298 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The Red River Colony was the Hudson’s Bay Company’s first planned settlement. As a settler-colonial project par excellence, it was designed to undercut Indigenous peoples’ “troublesome” autonomy and curtain the company’s dependency on their labour. In this critical re-evaluation of the history of the Red River Colony, Susan Dianne Brophy upends standard accounts by foregrounding Indigenous producers as a driving force of change. A Legacy of Exploitation challenges the enduring yet misleading fantasy of Canada as a glorious nation of adventurers, showing how autonomy can become distorted as complicity in processes of dispossession.


Download The Forest Resource of the Red River Valley PDF
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Publisher :
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ISBN 10 : UOM:39015068565897
Pages : 57 pages
Rating : 4.3/5 (91 users)
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Download or read book The Forest Resource of the Red River Valley written by Minnesota. Department of Iron Range Resources and Rehabilitation and published by . This book was released on 1954 with total page 57 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt:


Download The Concise Garland Encyclopedia of World Music  Volume 1 PDF
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Publisher : Routledge
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ISBN 10 : 9781136095702
Pages : 800 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (36 users)
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Download or read book The Concise Garland Encyclopedia of World Music Volume 1 written by Garland Encyclopedia of World Music and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2013-01-11 with total page 800 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The Concise Garland Encyclopedia of World Music comprises two volumes, and can only be purchased as the two-volume set. To purchase the set please go to: http://www.routledge.com/9780415972932


Download Environmental Hydraulics  Volume 1 PDF
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Publisher : CRC Press
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ISBN 10 : 9781482241839
Pages : 716 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (822 users)
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Download or read book Environmental Hydraulics Volume 1 written by Georgos C. Christodoulou and published by CRC Press. This book was released on 2022-03-07 with total page 716 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Over the last two decades environmental hydraulics as an academic discipline has expanded considerably, caused by growing concerns over water environmental issues associated with pollution and water balance problems on regional and global scale. These issues require a thorough understanding of processes related to environmental flows and transport phenomena, and the development of new approaches for practical solutions. Environmental Hydraulics includes about 200 contributions from 35 countries presented at the 6th International Symposium on Environmental Hydraulics (Athens, Greece, 23-25 June 2010). They cover the state-of-the-art on a broad range of topics, including: fundamentals aspects of environmental fluid mechanics; environmental hydraulics problems of inland, coastal and ground waters; interfacial processes; computational, experimental and field measurement techniques; ecological aspects, and effects of global climate change. Environmental Hydraulics will be of interest to researchers, civil/environmental engineers, and professional engineers dealing with the design and operation of environmental hydraulic works such as wastewater treatment and disposal, river and marine constructions, and to academics and graduate students in related fields.


Download 150 Years of Canada PDF
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Publisher : Waxmann Verlag
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ISBN 10 : 9783830991243
Pages : 254 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (39 users)
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Download or read book 150 Years of Canada written by Ursula Lehmkuhl and published by Waxmann Verlag. This book was released on 2020 with total page 254 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: On July 1, 2017, Canada celebrated the 150th anniversary of Confederation. The nation-wide festivities prompted ambiguous reactions and contradictory responses since they officially proclaimed to celebrate 'what it means to be Canadian.' Drawing on the analytical perspectives of Diversity Studies, this fifth volume of the 'Diversity / Diversité / Diversität' series explores the repercussions of 'Canada 150's' focus on identity. The contributions touch upon issues of Canada's French and English dualism; of its settler colonial past and present and the role of Indigenous Peoples in Canada's identity narrative; of Canada's religious, cultural, ethnic and racial diversity; and of the challenge of forging a 'Canadian' identity. The authors analyze these and other problems arising from the tensions between identity and diversity by empirically addressing topics such as multicultural memories, Canadian literary and political discourses, Métis history, Canada's Indigenous peoples, Canada's official federal discourse on language and culture, and Canada's evolving citizenship regimes. Contributors: Marie-Eve Beaulieu, Charles Blattberg, Paul Carls, Sarah Henzi, Jane Jenson, Wolfgang Klooss, Gillian Lane-Mercier, Pierre Lavoie, Ursula Lehmkuhl, Laurence McFalls, Nikolas Schall, Lisa Schaub, Elisabeth Tutschek


Download Beyond Control PDF
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Publisher : Univ. Press of Mississippi
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ISBN 10 : 9781496811141
Pages : 304 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (968 users)
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Download or read book Beyond Control written by James F. Barnett and published by Univ. Press of Mississippi. This book was released on 2017-03-16 with total page 304 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Beyond Control reveals the Mississippi as a waterway of change, unnaturally confined by ever-larger levees and control structures. During the great flood of 1973, the current scoured a hole beneath the main structure near Baton Rouge and enlarged a pre-existing football-field-size crater. That night the Mississippi River nearly changed its course for a shorter and steeper path to the sea. Such a map-changing reconfiguration of the country's largest river would bear national significance as well as disastrous consequences for New Orleans and towns like Morgan City, at the mouth of the Atchafalaya River. Since 1973, the US Army Corps of Engineers Control Complex at Old River has kept the Mississippi from jumping out of its historic channel and plunging through the Atchafalaya Basin to the Gulf of Mexico. Beyond Control traces the history of this phenomenon, beginning with a major channel shift around 3,000 years ago. By the time European colonists began to explore the Lower Mississippi Valley, a unique confluence of waterways had formed where the Red River joined the Mississippi, and the Atchafalaya River flowed out into the Atchafalaya Basin. A series of human alterations to this potentially volatile web of rivers, starting with a bend cutoff in 1831 by Captain Henry Miller Shreve, set the forces in motion for the Mississippi's move into the Atchafalaya Basin. Told against the backdrop of the Lower Mississippi River's impending diversion, the book's chapters chronicle historic floods, rising flood crests, a changing strategy for flood protection, and competing interests in the management of the Old River outlet. Beyond Control is both a history and a close look at an inexorable, living process happening now in the twenty-first century.


Download Flooding Problems  Red River of the North PDF
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Publisher :
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ISBN 10 : LOC:00183656351
Pages : 109 pages
Rating : 4.0/5 (18 users)
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Download or read book Flooding Problems Red River of the North written by United States. Congress. House. Committee on Public Works and Transportation. Subcommittee on Investigations and Review and published by . This book was released on 1978 with total page 109 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt:


Download White People  Indians  and Highlanders PDF
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Publisher : Oxford University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780199887644
Pages : 392 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (998 users)
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Download or read book White People Indians and Highlanders written by Colin G. Calloway and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2008-07-03 with total page 392 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In nineteenth century paintings, the proud Indian warrior and the Scottish Highland chief appear in similar ways--colorful and wild, righteous and warlike, the last of their kind. Earlier accounts depict both as barbarians, lacking in culture and in need of civilization. By the nineteenth century, intermarriage and cultural contact between the two--described during the Seven Years' War as cousins--was such that Cree, Mohawk, Cherokee, and Salish were often spoken with Gaelic accents. In this imaginative work of imperial and tribal history, Colin Calloway examines why these two seemingly wildly disparate groups appear to have so much in common. Both Highland clans and Native American societies underwent parallel experiences on the peripheries of Britain's empire, and often encountered one another on the frontier. Indeed, Highlanders and American Indians fought, traded, and lived together. Both groups were treated as tribal peoples--remnants of a barbaric past--and eventually forced from their ancestral lands as their traditional food sources--cattle in the Highlands and bison on the Great Plains--were decimated to make way for livestock farming. In a familiar pattern, the cultures that conquered them would later romanticize the very ways of life they had destroyed. White People, Indians, and Highlanders illustrates how these groups alternately resisted and accommodated the cultural and economic assault of colonialism, before their eventual dispossession during the Highland Clearances and Indian Removals. What emerges is a finely-drawn portrait of how indigenous peoples with their own rich identities experienced cultural change, economic transformation, and demographic dislocation amidst the growing power of the British and American empires.