Download White People  Indians  and Highlanders PDF
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Publisher : OUP USA
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ISBN 10 : 9780195340129
Pages : 368 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (953 users)
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Download or read book White People Indians and Highlanders written by Colin G. Calloway and published by OUP USA. This book was released on 2008-07-03 with total page 368 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: A comparative approach to the American Indians and Scottish Highlanders, this book examines the experiences of clans and tribal societies, which underwent parallel experiences on the peripheries of Britain's empire in Britain, the United States, and Canada.


Download White People  Indians  and Highlanders PDF
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Publisher : Oxford University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780199887644
Pages : 392 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (998 users)
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Download or read book White People Indians and Highlanders written by Colin G. Calloway and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2008-07-03 with total page 392 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In nineteenth century paintings, the proud Indian warrior and the Scottish Highland chief appear in similar ways--colorful and wild, righteous and warlike, the last of their kind. Earlier accounts depict both as barbarians, lacking in culture and in need of civilization. By the nineteenth century, intermarriage and cultural contact between the two--described during the Seven Years' War as cousins--was such that Cree, Mohawk, Cherokee, and Salish were often spoken with Gaelic accents. In this imaginative work of imperial and tribal history, Colin Calloway examines why these two seemingly wildly disparate groups appear to have so much in common. Both Highland clans and Native American societies underwent parallel experiences on the peripheries of Britain's empire, and often encountered one another on the frontier. Indeed, Highlanders and American Indians fought, traded, and lived together. Both groups were treated as tribal peoples--remnants of a barbaric past--and eventually forced from their ancestral lands as their traditional food sources--cattle in the Highlands and bison on the Great Plains--were decimated to make way for livestock farming. In a familiar pattern, the cultures that conquered them would later romanticize the very ways of life they had destroyed. White People, Indians, and Highlanders illustrates how these groups alternately resisted and accommodated the cultural and economic assault of colonialism, before their eventual dispossession during the Highland Clearances and Indian Removals. What emerges is a finely-drawn portrait of how indigenous peoples with their own rich identities experienced cultural change, economic transformation, and demographic dislocation amidst the growing power of the British and American empires.


Download White People  Indians  and Highlanders PDF
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Publisher : Oxford University Press
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ISBN 10 : 0199712891
Pages : 392 pages
Rating : 4.7/5 (128 users)
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Download or read book White People Indians and Highlanders written by Colin G. Calloway and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2008-07-03 with total page 392 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In nineteenth century paintings, the proud Indian warrior and the Scottish Highland chief appear in similar ways--colorful and wild, righteous and warlike, the last of their kind. Earlier accounts depict both as barbarians, lacking in culture and in need of civilization. By the nineteenth century, intermarriage and cultural contact between the two--described during the Seven Years' War as cousins--was such that Cree, Mohawk, Cherokee, and Salish were often spoken with Gaelic accents. In this imaginative work of imperial and tribal history, Colin Calloway examines why these two seemingly wildly disparate groups appear to have so much in common. Both Highland clans and Native American societies underwent parallel experiences on the peripheries of Britain's empire, and often encountered one another on the frontier. Indeed, Highlanders and American Indians fought, traded, and lived together. Both groups were treated as tribal peoples--remnants of a barbaric past--and eventually forced from their ancestral lands as their traditional food sources--cattle in the Highlands and bison on the Great Plains--were decimated to make way for livestock farming. In a familiar pattern, the cultures that conquered them would later romanticize the very ways of life they had destroyed. White People, Indians, and Highlanders illustrates how these groups alternately resisted and accommodated the cultural and economic assault of colonialism, before their eventual dispossession during the Highland Clearances and Indian Removals. What emerges is a finely-drawn portrait of how indigenous peoples with their own rich identities experienced cultural change, economic transformation, and demographic dislocation amidst the growing power of the British and American empires.


Download Scotland and America  c 1600 c 1800 PDF
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Publisher : Bloomsbury Publishing
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ISBN 10 : 9781137108357
Pages : 224 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (371 users)
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Download or read book Scotland and America c 1600 c 1800 written by Alexander Murdoch and published by Bloomsbury Publishing. This book was released on 2009-12-18 with total page 224 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: While the literature relating to Scottish contact with America has grown significantly in recent years, the influence of America on Scotland and its early modern history has been neglected in favour of a preoccupation with Scottish influence on the formation of North American national identities. Alexander Murdoch's fascinating new study explores Scottish interactions with North America in a desire to open up fresh perspectives on the subject. Scotland and America, c.1600-c.1800 - Surveys the key centuries of economic, migratory and cultural exchange, including Canada and the Caribbean - Discusses Scottish participation in the Atlantic slave trade and the debate over its abolition - Considers the Scottish experience of British unionism with respect to developing American traditions of unionism in the U.S. and Canada Incorporating the latest research, this is essential reading for anyone interested in the dynamic relationship between Scotland and America during a key period in history.


Download To the Ends of the Earth PDF
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Publisher : Penguin UK
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ISBN 10 : 9780241960646
Pages : 416 pages
Rating : 4.2/5 (419 users)
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Download or read book To the Ends of the Earth written by T. M. Devine and published by Penguin UK. This book was released on 2011-08-25 with total page 416 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: SPECTATOR, NEW STATESMAN, SCOTLAND ON SUNDAY and THE HERALD BOOKS OF THE YEAR The Scots are one of the world's greatest nations of emigrants. For centuries, untold numbers of men, women and children have sought their fortunes in every conceivable walk of life and in every imaginable climate across the British Empire, the United States and elsewhere, from finance to industry, philosophy to politics. To the Ends of the Earth puts this extraordinary epic centre stage, taking many famous stories and removing layers of myth and sentiment to reveal the no less startling truth, paying particular attention to the exceptional Scottish role as traders, missionaries and soldiers. This major new book is also a study of the impact of this global world on Scotland itself and the degree to which the Scottish economy was for many years an imperial economy, with intimate, important links through shipping, engineering, jute and banking to the most remote of settlements. Filled with fascinating stories and with an acute awareness of the poverty and social inequality that provoked so much emigration, To the Ends of the Earth will make its readers think about the world in quite a different way.


Download Racism and Sociology PDF
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Publisher : LIT Verlag Münster
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ISBN 10 : 9783643905987
Pages : 237 pages
Rating : 4.6/5 (439 users)
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Download or read book Racism and Sociology written by Wulf D. Hund and published by LIT Verlag Münster. This book was released on 2014 with total page 237 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This volume presents various perspectives regarding the intersection of racism and sociology. Contents include: Racism in White Sociology: From Adam Smith to Max Weber * Postracial Silences: The Othering of Race in Europe * From the Congo to Chicago: Robert E. Park's Romance with Racism * Telling about Racism: W.E.B. Du Bois, Stuart Hall, and Sociology's Reconstruction * Racism's Alterity: The After-Life of Black Sociology * Whitening Intersectionality: Evanescence of Race in Intersectionality Scholarship * The Politics of (Anti-)Racism: Academic Research and Policy Discourse in Europe. (Series: Racism Analysis - Series B: Yearbooks - Vol. 5) [Subject: Sociology, Racial Studies]


Download Between Sovereignty and Anarchy PDF
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Publisher : University of Virginia Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780813936796
Pages : 288 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (139 users)
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Download or read book Between Sovereignty and Anarchy written by Patrick Griffin and published by University of Virginia Press. This book was released on 2015-04-06 with total page 288 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Between Sovereignty and Anarchy considers the conceptual and political problem of violence in the early modern Anglo-Atlantic, charting an innovative approach to the history of the American Revolution. Its editors and contributors contend that existing scholarship on the Revolution largely ignores questions of power and downplays the Revolution as a contest over sovereignty. Contributors employ a variety of methodologies to examine diverse themes, ranging from how Atlantic perspectives can redefine our understanding of revolutionary origins, to the ways in which political culture, mobilization, and civil-war-like violence were part of the revolutionary process, to the fundamental importance of state formation for the history of the early republic. The editors skillfully meld these emerging currents to produce a new perspective on the American Revolution, revealing how America—first as colonies, then as united states—reeled between poles of anarchy and sovereignty. This interpretation—gleaned from essays on frontier bloodshed, religion, civility, slavery, loyalism, mobilization, early national political culture, and war making—provides a needed stimulus to a field that has not strayed beyond the bounds of "rhetoric versus reality" for more than a generation. Between Sovereignty and Anarchy raises foundational questions about how we are to view the American Revolution and the experimental democracy that emerged in its wake. Contributors: Chris Beneke, Bentley University · Andrew Cayton, Miami University · Matthew Rainbow Hale, Goucher College · David C. Hendrickson, Colorado College · John C. Kotruch, University of New Hampshire · Peter C. Messer, Mississippi State University · Kenneth Owen, University of Illinois at Springfield · Jeffrey L. Pasley, University of Missouri, Columbia · Jessica Choppin Roney, Temple University · Peter Thompson, University of Oxford


Download Native Americans  Christianity  and the Reshaping of the American Religious Landscape PDF
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Publisher : Univ of North Carolina Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780807899663
Pages : 344 pages
Rating : 4.8/5 (78 users)
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Download or read book Native Americans Christianity and the Reshaping of the American Religious Landscape written by Joel W. Martin and published by Univ of North Carolina Press. This book was released on 2010-10-11 with total page 344 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In this interdisciplinary collection of essays, Joel W. Martin and Mark A. Nicholas gather emerging and leading voices in the study of Native American religion to reconsider the complex and often misunderstood history of Native peoples' engagement with Christianity and with Euro-American missionaries. Surveying mission encounters from contact through the mid-nineteenth century, the volume alters and enriches our understanding of both American Christianity and indigenous religion. The essays here explore a variety of postcontact identities, including indigenous Christians, "mission friendly" non-Christians, and ex-Christians, thereby exploring the shifting world of Native-white cultural and religious exchange. Rather than questioning the authenticity of Native Christian experiences, these scholars reveal how indigenous peoples negotiated change with regard to missions, missionaries, and Christianity. This collection challenges the pervasive stereotype of Native Americans as culturally static and ill-equipped to navigate the roiling currents associated with colonialism and missionization. The contributors are Emma Anderson, Joanna Brooks, Steven W. Hackel, Tracy Neal Leavelle, Daniel Mandell, Joel W. Martin, Michael D. McNally, Mark A. Nicholas, Michelene Pesantubbee, David J. Silverman, Laura M. Stevens, Rachel Wheeler, Douglas L. Winiarski, and Hilary E. Wyss.


Download Irish and Scottish Encounters with Indigenous Peoples PDF
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Publisher : McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
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ISBN 10 : 9780773588813
Pages : 392 pages
Rating : 4.7/5 (735 users)
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Download or read book Irish and Scottish Encounters with Indigenous Peoples written by Graeme Morton and published by McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP. This book was released on 2013-05-01 with total page 392 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The expansion of the British Empire during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries created the greatest mass migration in human history, in which the Irish and Scots played a central, complex, and controversial role. The essays in this volume explore the diverse encounters Irish and Scottish migrants had with Indigenous peoples in North America and Australasia. The Irish and Scots were among the most active and enthusiastic participants in what one contributor describes as "the greatest single period of land theft, cultural pillage, and casual genocide in world history." At the same time, some settlers attempted to understand Indigenous society rather than destroy it, while others incorporated a romanticized view of Natives into a radical critique of European society, and others still empathized with Natives as fellow victims of imperialism. These essays investigate the extent to which the condition of being Irish and Scottish affected settlers' attitudes to Indigenous peoples, and examine the political, social, religious, cultural, and economic dimensions of their interactions. Presenting a variety of viewpoints, the editors reach the provocative conclusion that the Scottish and Irish origins of settlers were less important in determining attitudes and behaviour than were the specific circumstances in which those settlers found themselves at different times and places in North America, Australia and New Zealand. Contributors include Donald Harman Akenson (Queen's), John Eastlake (College Cork), Marjory Harper (Aberdeen), Andrew Hinson (Toronto), Michele Holmgren (Mount Royal), Kevin Hutchings (Northern British Columbia), Anne Lederman (Royal Conservatory of Music), Patricia A. McCormack (Alberta), Mark G. McGowan (Toronto), Ann McGrath (Australian National), Cian T. McMahon (Nevada), Graeme Morton (Guelph), Michael Newton (Xavier), Pádraig Ó Siadhail (Saint Mary's), Brad Patterson (Victoria University of Wellington), Beverly Soloway (Lakehead), and David A. Wilson (Toronto).


Download Geographies of the Romantic North PDF
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Publisher : Springer
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ISBN 10 : 9781137311320
Pages : 265 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (373 users)
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Download or read book Geographies of the Romantic North written by A. Byrne and published by Springer. This book was released on 2013-08-28 with total page 265 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This book examines British scientific and antiquarian travels in the "North," circa 1790–1830. British perceptions, representations and imaginings of the North are considered part of late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century processes of British self-fashioning as a Northern nation, and key in unifying the expanding North Atlantic empire.


Download The Oxford Handbook of Modern Scottish History PDF
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Publisher : Oxford University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780199563692
Pages : 707 pages
Rating : 4.1/5 (995 users)
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Download or read book The Oxford Handbook of Modern Scottish History written by T. M. Devine and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2012-01-26 with total page 707 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: A landmark study which reconsiders in fresh and illuminating ways the classic themes of the nation's history since the sixteenth century, as well as a number of new topics which are only now receiving detailed attention. Places the Scottish experience firmly in an international historical experience.


Download Masters of the Middle Waters PDF
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Publisher : Harvard University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780674239784
Pages : 336 pages
Rating : 4.6/5 (742 users)
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Download or read book Masters of the Middle Waters written by Jacob F. Lee and published by Harvard University Press. This book was released on 2019-03-11 with total page 336 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Jacob Lee offers a new understanding of the conquest of the American West based on the long history of warfare and resistance in the Mississippi River valley. The river and its tributaries were never simply a backdrop to unfolding events but advanced and thwarted the aspirations of Native nations, European imperialists, and American settlers alike.


Download Global Migrations PDF
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Publisher : Edinburgh University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9781474410052
Pages : 304 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (744 users)
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Download or read book Global Migrations written by McCarthy Angela McCarthy and published by Edinburgh University Press. This book was released on 2016-05-31 with total page 304 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: From the seventeenth century to the current day, more than 2.5 million Scots have sought new lives elsewhere. This book of essays from established and emerging scholars examines the impact since 1600 of out migration from Scotland on the homeland, the migrants and the destinations in which they settled, and their descendants and 'affinity' Scots. It does so through a focus on the under-researched themes of slavery, cross-cultural encounters, economics, war, tourism, and the modern diaspora since 1945. It spans diverse destinations including Europe, the USA, Canada, New Zealand, Australia, South Africa, Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), Hong Kong, Guyana and the British World more broadly. A key objective is to consider whether the Scottish factor mattered.


Download Treason and Rebellion in the British Atlantic  1685 1800 PDF
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Publisher : Bloomsbury Publishing
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ISBN 10 : 9781350005303
Pages : 264 pages
Rating : 4.3/5 (5 users)
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Download or read book Treason and Rebellion in the British Atlantic 1685 1800 written by Peter Rushton and published by Bloomsbury Publishing. This book was released on 2020-07-23 with total page 264 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This book examines internal political conflicts in the British Empire within the legal framework of treason and sedition. The threat of treason and rebellion pervaded the British Atlantic in the 17th and 18th centuries; Britain's control of its territories was continually threatened by rebellion and war, both at home and in North America. Even after American independence, Britain and its former colony continued to be fearful that opposition and revolution might follow the French example, and both took legal measures to control both speech and political action. This study places these conflicts within a political and legal framework of the laws of treason and sedition as they developed in the British Atlantic. The treason laws originated in the reign of Edward III, and were adapted and modified in the 16th and 17th centuries. They were exported to the colonies, where they underwent both adaptation and elaboration in application in the slave societies as well as those dominated by free settlers. Relationships with natives and European rivals in the Americas affected the definitions of treason in practice, and the divided loyalties of the American revolutionary war added further problems of defining loyalty and treachery. Treason and Rebellion in the British Atlantic, 1685-1800 offers a new study of treason and sedition in the period by placing them in a truly transatlantic perspective, making it a valuable study for those interested in the legal and political of Britain's empire and 18th-century revolutions.


Download Carolina in Crisis PDF
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Publisher : UNC Press Books
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ISBN 10 : 9781469621234
Pages : 288 pages
Rating : 4.4/5 (696 users)
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Download or read book Carolina in Crisis written by Daniel J. Tortora and published by UNC Press Books. This book was released on 2015-05-25 with total page 288 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In this engaging history, Daniel J. Tortora explores how the Anglo-Cherokee War reshaped the political and cultural landscape of the colonial South. Tortora chronicles the series of clashes that erupted from 1758 to 1761 between Cherokees, settlers, and British troops. The conflict, no insignificant sideshow to the French and Indian War, eventually led to the regeneration of a British-Cherokee alliance. Tortora reveals how the war destabilized the South Carolina colony and threatened the white coastal elite, arguing that the political and military success of the Cherokees led colonists to a greater fear of slave resistance and revolt and ultimately nurtured South Carolinians' rising interest in the movement for independence. Drawing on newspaper accounts, military and diplomatic correspondence, and the speeches of Cherokee people, among other sources, this work reexamines the experiences of Cherokees, whites, and African Americans in the mid-eighteenth century. Centering his analysis on Native American history, Tortora reconsiders the rise of revolutionary sentiments in the South while also detailing the Anglo-Cherokee War from the Cherokee perspective.


Download Unpacking the Kists PDF
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Publisher : McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
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ISBN 10 : 9780773589780
Pages : 472 pages
Rating : 4.7/5 (735 users)
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Download or read book Unpacking the Kists written by Brad Patterson and published by McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP. This book was released on 2013-11-01 with total page 472 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Historians have suggested that Scottish influences are more pervasive in New Zealand than in any other country outside Scotland, yet curiously New Zealand's Scots migrants have previously attracted only limited attention. A thorough and interdisciplinary work, Unpacking the Kists is the first in-depth study of New Zealand's Scots migrants and their impact on an evolving settler society. The authors establish the dimensions of Scottish migration to New Zealand, the principal source areas, the migrants' demographic characteristics, and where they settled in the new land. Drawing from extended case-studies, they examine how migrants adapted to their new environment and the extent of longevity in diverse areas including the economy, religion, politics, education, and folkways. They also look at the private worlds of family, neighbourhood, community, customs of everyday life and leisure pursuits, and expressions of both high and low forms of transplanted culture. Adding to international scholarship on migrations and cultural adaptations, Unpacking the Kists demonstrates the historic contributions Scots made to New Zealand culture by retaining their ethnic connections and at the same time interacting with other ethnic groups.


Download The Fatal Land PDF
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Publisher : Yale University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780300196726
Pages : 297 pages
Rating : 4.3/5 (1 users)
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Download or read book The Fatal Land written by Matthew P. Dziennik and published by Yale University Press. This book was released on 2015-01-01 with total page 297 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: "Matthew P. Dziennik has written a compelling account of the Scottish Highland soldier and his service in Great Britain's American colonies during the French and Indian War and America's Revolutionary War. In the middle to the late decades of the eighteenth century, the British state recruited more than twelve thousand soldiers from the Highlands of Scotland for the purpose of expanding and defending Britain's American empire, thereby transforming the most maligned region of the British Isles into a key sustainer of British imperialism. Dziennik's fascinating history corrects the mythologized image of the Highland soldier as a noble savage, a primitive if courageous relic of clanship, revealing instead how the Gaels used their military service to further their own interests in terms of material security and social status. Using both English and Gaelic sources, the author re-creates the experiences and the mindset of the Highland soldier in the New World and demonstrates in the process how a periphery of the British Isles became a center of the British Empire." -- [Tiré de la jaquette].